Anxiety and why you need to breathe

First, it is important to differentiate stress from anxiety. Stress is a normal reaction to a situation of fear. Our amygdala, a part of our brain that receives and interprets information, reacts to external stimuli. For example, being in front of a lion or before giving a conference in front of several people both cause a stress signal. Stress in these situations mobilizes the energy necessary to survive or preserve our ego.

Anxiety is rather a failure of our stress system. The harmless situations sound the alarm in our brain as if we are in great danger. Anxiety is often anchored in future or past moments and is based on assumptions rather than facts.

Panic as a defense.

The rapid pulse and breathing, the tense muscles and the rising heat are normal symptoms of the panic attack, which is often part of generalized anxiety disorder. Having a first panic attack can be very unsettling.You can have the impression that you can no longer breathe and that you are having a heart attack! Panic is the acute phase of anxiety, sending the message to the brain that the body must act immediately and that danger is imminent.

Breathing and mindfulness

The number one enemy of anxiety and panic attack is mindfulness. Mindfulness is the recognition and acceptance of one's thoughts, internal mechanisms of the body and the brain in tune with the external environment. Obviously, you have to practice a lot to calm your anxiety. You can practice through mediation, yoga, creative activities, playful and imaginative play, as well as sport and visualization through it.

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